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My name is Steve Young and I am a retired California Highway Patrol Officer. I will also be your instructor in one of the online traffic courses with B Line Traffic Schools. No matter what course you sign up for, my goals are the same: Present you with the information that you need in a way that will not put you to sleep and then get you back to your life.  Throughout some of the courses I have included interesting situations, people and other random things I have come across in my 25+ years with the CHP to break things up a bit. Ok ok, enough about me. Close this window and start your course with B Line Traffic Schools today.

Teaching Your Teen to Drive

02 Nov Blog | Comments

Teaching children to drive is a milestone that parents look forward to with both excited anticipation and dread. Preparing your child for the California driving test, or any other state’s driving test, doesn’t have to be stressful. If you relax and enjoy yourself, not only will you be teaching your teen to drive but you will teach them responsibility and good judgment as well.

Do
- Get your child in the car and teach them the basics. It may seem simplistic but knowing exactly where all of the controls are will be beneficial if your child gets nervous.
- Tell your child exactly where you will be going and what you will be teaching them. When children have a plan they are less anxious and you will be, too.
- Encourage your child. Too often, parents sit in the passenger seat white-knuckling the dash. Let go, relax and tell your child what it is that they are doing well and encourage their responsible driving habits.
- When your child makes mistakes, and s/he will, point them out without being overly critical.
- Stay calm! Nothing is going to make your child more nervous or more likely to over correct than if you sit in the passenger seat shouting orders.
- Practice driving often. If you’re taking a quick trip to the store or taking your child to a school sponsored sporting event, let them drive.
- Enroll your child in a driver’s license test prep course. Doing so will help them prepare for their test and knowing what to expect will give them more confidence on the day of the exam.
- Teach your child how to change a tire and check fluid levels.
- Drive properly when you’re behind the wheel. Teach your teen how to drive by setting a good example, curb the road rage and follow the rules of the road.

Don’t

- Take your child onto the highway for their first lesson. Gradually increase the difficulty of your lessons: start in a parking lot, move to neighborhood streets, go on to city streets and then to the highway.

- Set your child up to fail. Consistently berating your teen or talking down to them is a sort of self-fulfilling prophecy; if you constantly tell them they’re going to be a horrible driver, they will be.

- Argue with your teen. Your driving lesson should be used for just that: driving. Don’t spend the time arguing with your child about missed chores, poor test scores or the myriad of other complaints you may have.
- Neglect the use of a professional. If you know yourself well enough to realize that you may not be the best instructor for your child’s driving lesson, consider hiring a professional or recruiting another trusted adult.
- Rush the test. Your teen will want to take their california driving test at the very first opportunity. If your child isn’t ready, don’t allow them to take the test until they are.

Teaching your child how to drive should be a fun experience for both of you. Done properly, you’ll have stories and anecdotes that will last a life time. Sign your child up for driver’s license test prep and practice their driving at home. Relax and enjoy this bonding time with your teen.

 

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